Multicolored Hair (a short rant)

Here at Hearthrose Image Consulting, I’m all about helping you make exactly the statement you want to make to the world at large.  Nonhuman hair coloring on humans past age 25 is a sign of extreme whimsy, so I probably wouldn’t recommend it to anyone who isn’t working as an artist of some kind.

That said, I don’t understand why most school dress codes don’t allow children to have rainbow colored hair. *  If there was ever a time to experiment with your personal style and indulge yourself deeply in whimsy, it is in your teens and tweenage years.  If someone looks like a My Little Pony doll, I think they should be the right age to *own* a My Little Pony doll.  Age appropriate dressing goes both ways, people!  Let the children dress like children.

Once upon a time (thirty years ago), rainbow hair was a sign of rebellion, it was punk.  Not any more! It’s just kind of cute.  The same thing goes for mohawks and other extreme hairstyles… let the kids be.  They’ll have plenty of time to cut it off and grow it back out before they join the workaday world, and maybe they’ll have gotten the whole thing out of their systems.

I want the kids to learn mature values – honesty, integrity, hard-work, perseverance, etc.  I don’t need them to dress up in grown-up drag.  Life is meant to be lived and enjoyed as a procession of seasons… and our culture seems to want to slap everyone into an eternity of existence between 18 and 28.  Stop already!

Insofar as I’m concerned, one of the first steps to savoring one’s maturity is to recognize it as a change to be embraced.    I want children to dress like children – truly like children, in bright colors and garments that will hold up under some play.  And I want a floor-length velvet dressing gown.  My 12yo daughter wouldn’t want to trip over the hem, I don’t want purple hair.  Seems like a fair division of goodies to me…

So, let the kids dye their hair orange, blue and pink – personally, I think it’s age-appropriate, and adorable.

 

 

 

*Okay, fine.  I do understand the logic of distraction.  I don’t agree with it, but I understand the argument.


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