Classic Clothes

Fashion goes back and forth in the details, but since the mid-seventies, this is what consists of a classic woman’s work wardrobe:

  • Skirt, knee length, straightish.
  • Blouse, plain neck (shell)
  • Shirt, buttondown
  • Blazer, mid-hip length
  • Slacks, not tight

We’re coming to one of those fashion seasons when the silhouette is about to undergo a drastic change, so I recommend that if you work and you’re investing in expensive pieces, you keep your items more neutral in shape.

Example:  The pencil skirt has been the default “knee-length skirt, straightish” for the past decade.  Extreme versions of this skirt have been shown that are so tight you’re wondering how the poor woman bends over.  You can fish tail it a bit, make a higher waist, etc – all of which make the skirt more extreme.

So, when we’re in the middle of a pencil skirt season, and when those styles look amazing on you?  Go for it.

Right at this moment, you’re not seeing the ultra-feminine frills on those skirts.  That straight skirt is still tight, but it’s gotten straighter, dropped just below the kneecap, and you’re suddenly seeing soft pleated skirts come in.  (Those, btw, are where the feminine woman should go).

I wouldn’t push anyone to buy a mermaid skirt right this minute, unless it was a one-season item, like a bridal gown.

Blazers are seeing a huge change.  Again, we’ve been in a very feminine mode where peplums and extremely fitted designs have been all the rage.  But all things pass.  Your figure suits a fitted jacket?  A trim classic blazer is your friend.  Your figure didn’t really love those curves?  Shout hallelujah, because boxy is back.

That’s how it goes.  When a fashion suits you – wear it.  When it doesn’t, retreat to classic lines that do.

Because style is so fluid, and one line and another look utterly different, the only real sin is to be caught in something that was all the rage – two years ago.   And that’s why investment buys should be classic, always classic.  (Or utterly off the beaten path – again, only what was “in” can ever be “out”).


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